Gitie's blog

Collared Scops Owl at Ranthambore National Park

Zooming through the Ranthambore National Park in search of tigers, we discovered some beautiful birds in the Indian jungle. Here we have a collered-scops owl snugly resting in the hollow of the minarka.

collared scops owl at Ranthambore National Park

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Eagles Bathing At The Taj Mahal

Seeing the Taj Mahal, one of the wonders of the world is always amazing. Our visit was made even more enthralling when we found two glorious eagles bathing in the pool of water on the lawns of the beautiful gardens.  

Eagles at the Taj Mahal

 

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Chatty Indian Rufous Treepie at Ranthambore

 Renowned for its tigers, Ranthambore National Park, India  has spectacular birds as well.  Bold, beautiful and friendly, this magnificent bird, a rufous treepie came over to chat with us while we had stopped by one of the 3 lakes to photograph the jungle scenery. The local call them pipers.

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Crow and I

By Belinda Elbourn

Belinda-and -crowA couple of years passed and we had moved to another farm, when Darren came home with a baby crow that he had found on the road.
 
I named him “Crow” this crow was even nosier than Camry (Darren said this one must be a girl).
 
Crow lived in our sun room, Crow was very smart she new she wasn’t allowed to enter into the kitchen so she would just sit in the doorway and poke her head in to see what we were doing.
 
 
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Fungus Causes Deadly Bat Disease

News Release from USGS (26 October, 2011)

The appropriately named fungus Geomyces destructans is the cause of deadly white-nose syndrome (WNS) in bats, according to research published today in the journal Nature. The study by U.S. Geological Survey scientists and partners, conducted at the USGS National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisc., provides the first direct evidence that the fungus G. destructans causes WNS, a rapidly spreading disease in North American bats.

bat with whitenosed disease

Credit: Al Hicks, NY Dept. of Environmental Conservation

 

“By identifying what causes WNS, this study will greatly enhance the ability of decision makers to develop management strategies to preserve vulnerable bat populations and the ecosystem services that they provide in the U.S. and Canada,” said Anne Kinsinger, USGS Associate Director of Ecosystems.

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